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May 20, 2015

Jn 17: 11b-19

And now I am no longer in the world, but they are in the world, and I am coming to you. Holy Father, protect them in your name that you have given me, so that they may be one, as we are one. While I was with them, I protected them in your name that you have given me. I guarded them, and not one of them was lost except the one destined to be lost, so that the scripture might be fulfilled. But now I am coming to you, and I speak these things in the world so that they may have my joy made complete in themselves. I have given them your word, and the world has hated them because they do not belong to the world, just as I do not belong to the world. I am not asking you to take them out of the world, but I ask you to protect them from the evil one. They do not belong to the world, just as I do not belong to the world. Sanctify them in the truth; your word is truth. As you have sent me into the world, so I have sent them into the world. And for their sakes I sanctify myself, so that they also may be sanctified in truth.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Sent into the World

Today’s gospel raises a key question all believers face: what is our relationship to the world?

For Christians, the answer boils down to which Christ we purport to follow.

In his landmark book, Christ and Culture, H. Richard Niebuhr identifies five concepts of Christ that have prevailed throughout Christian history—Christ against culture, Christ of culture, Christ above Culture, Christ and culture in paradox, and Christ transforming culture.

Giants of the Catholic tradition such as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Ignatius Loyola navigated their way through the two extremes—Christ against culture and Christ of culture—by embracing Christ above culture. For them, above does not mean “aloof” or “disengaged.” Rather, it means recognizing all that is good in the world as a gift from God while acknowledging that God’s grace and the mediation of the church are necessary to bring the world to full fruition.

As Jesus prepares to return to the Father, he prays for the disciples. Yet, no matter how great his concern for their well being in the world, he makes clear, “I am not asking you to take them out of the world . . .” Quite the opposite. Jesus prays to the Father, “As you have sent me into the world, so I have sent them into the world.”

Like Jesus and the disciples, we do not belong to the world. But we are sent into the world with the mission of knowing and revealing God’s love.

Ignatian spirituality challenges us to ask, How can I better see “God in all things”? How can I be a true “person for others”?

—Jeremy Langford is the director of communications for the Midwest Jesuits and author of  Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA.

Prayer

Act of Love
O my God, I love you above all things with my whole heart and soul, because you are all good and worthy of all my love. I love my neighbor as myself for the love of you. I forgive all who have injured me and I ask pardon of those whom I have injured.

Amen.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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St. Ignatius, the founder of the Jesuits, taught that a daily prayer practice helps us to discover God at work in our lives. The University of Detroit Jesuit High School and Academy invites you to join us in this Ignatian tradition of prayer, reflection, and discovery.



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May 20, 2015

Jn 17: 11b-19

And now I am no longer in the world, but they are in the world, and I am coming to you. Holy Father, protect them in your name that you have given me, so that they may be one, as we are one. While I was with them, I protected them in your name that you have given me. I guarded them, and not one of them was lost except the one destined to be lost, so that the scripture might be fulfilled. But now I am coming to you, and I speak these things in the world so that they may have my joy made complete in themselves. I have given them your word, and the world has hated them because they do not belong to the world, just as I do not belong to the world. I am not asking you to take them out of the world, but I ask you to protect them from the evil one. They do not belong to the world, just as I do not belong to the world. Sanctify them in the truth; your word is truth. As you have sent me into the world, so I have sent them into the world. And for their sakes I sanctify myself, so that they also may be sanctified in truth.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Sent into the World

Today’s gospel raises a key question all believers face: what is our relationship to the world?

For Christians, the answer boils down to which Christ we purport to follow.

In his landmark book, Christ and Culture, H. Richard Niebuhr identifies five concepts of Christ that have prevailed throughout Christian history—Christ against culture, Christ of culture, Christ above Culture, Christ and culture in paradox, and Christ transforming culture.

Giants of the Catholic tradition such as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Ignatius Loyola navigated their way through the two extremes—Christ against culture and Christ of culture—by embracing Christ above culture. For them, above does not mean “aloof” or “disengaged.” Rather, it means recognizing all that is good in the world as a gift from God while acknowledging that God’s grace and the mediation of the church are necessary to bring the world to full fruition.

As Jesus prepares to return to the Father, he prays for the disciples. Yet, no matter how great his concern for their well being in the world, he makes clear, “I am not asking you to take them out of the world . . .” Quite the opposite. Jesus prays to the Father, “As you have sent me into the world, so I have sent them into the world.”

Like Jesus and the disciples, we do not belong to the world. But we are sent into the world with the mission of knowing and revealing God’s love.

Ignatian spirituality challenges us to ask, How can I better see “God in all things”? How can I be a true “person for others”?

—Jeremy Langford is the director of communications for the Midwest Jesuits and author of  Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA.

Prayer

Act of Love
O my God, I love you above all things with my whole heart and soul, because you are all good and worthy of all my love. I love my neighbor as myself for the love of you. I forgive all who have injured me and I ask pardon of those whom I have injured.

Amen.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!