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April 3, 2018

Jn 20:11-18

But Mary stood weeping outside the tomb. As she wept, she bent over to look into the tomb; and she saw two angels in white, sitting where the body of Jesus had been lying, one at the head and the other at the feet.They said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping?” She said to them, “They have taken away my Lord, and I do not know where they have laid him.”

When she had said this, she turned around and saw Jesus standing there, but she did not know that it was Jesus. Jesus said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping? Whom are you looking for?” Supposing him to be the gardener, she said to him, “Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have laid him, and I will take him away.” Jesus said to her, “Mary!” She turned and said to him in Hebrew, “Rabbouni!” (which means Teacher).

Jesus said to her, “Do not hold on to me, because I have not yet ascended to the Father. But go to my brothers and say to them, ‘I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.’” Mary Magdalene went and announced to the disciples, “I have seen the Lord”; and she told them that he had said these things to her.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Hope grounded in Jesus

In the midst of pain and loss and in our own tombs of worry and anxiety, hope can seem an impossible distance away. Yet in these moments, we find Jesus asking: “Why are you weeping?”

In the Gospel today, Jesus does not tell Mary to stop crying or tell her to “keep her chin up.” Rather he stands before her and says in his loving way: even in the pain and darkness, I am here. It is not naïve hope, but a hope grounded in the loving embrace of Jesus.

Jesus’s words to Mary Magdalene echo back to us as a call to remember that the Resurrection is always possible, even in the darkest of moments. That is where our hope lies: not in what we can conceive of as possible, but in the impossible, incomprehensible love of Christ for us.

—Colten Biro, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic of the USA Central and Southern Province in First Studies at Saint Louis University. He is a frequent contributor to The Jesuit Post.

 

Prayer

                           Jesus, in you I have hope.
                         Even in my darkest moments.
                Moments of frustration and fierce anxiety.
                          Moments of pain and loss.
    Even in these, even when I cannot see you … you are there.
                 Jesus, in your embrace, I place my hope.

                                    —Colten Biro, SJ

 

 

 

 

 


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April 3, 2018

Jn 20:11-18

But Mary stood weeping outside the tomb. As she wept, she bent over to look into the tomb; and she saw two angels in white, sitting where the body of Jesus had been lying, one at the head and the other at the feet.They said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping?” She said to them, “They have taken away my Lord, and I do not know where they have laid him.”

When she had said this, she turned around and saw Jesus standing there, but she did not know that it was Jesus. Jesus said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping? Whom are you looking for?” Supposing him to be the gardener, she said to him, “Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have laid him, and I will take him away.” Jesus said to her, “Mary!” She turned and said to him in Hebrew, “Rabbouni!” (which means Teacher).

Jesus said to her, “Do not hold on to me, because I have not yet ascended to the Father. But go to my brothers and say to them, ‘I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.’” Mary Magdalene went and announced to the disciples, “I have seen the Lord”; and she told them that he had said these things to her.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Hope grounded in Jesus

In the midst of pain and loss and in our own tombs of worry and anxiety, hope can seem an impossible distance away. Yet in these moments, we find Jesus asking: “Why are you weeping?”

In the Gospel today, Jesus does not tell Mary to stop crying or tell her to “keep her chin up.” Rather he stands before her and says in his loving way: even in the pain and darkness, I am here. It is not naïve hope, but a hope grounded in the loving embrace of Jesus.

Jesus’s words to Mary Magdalene echo back to us as a call to remember that the Resurrection is always possible, even in the darkest of moments. That is where our hope lies: not in what we can conceive of as possible, but in the impossible, incomprehensible love of Christ for us.

—Colten Biro, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic of the USA Central and Southern Province in First Studies at Saint Louis University. He is a frequent contributor to The Jesuit Post.

 

Prayer

                           Jesus, in you I have hope.
                         Even in my darkest moments.
                Moments of frustration and fierce anxiety.
                          Moments of pain and loss.
    Even in these, even when I cannot see you … you are there.
                 Jesus, in your embrace, I place my hope.

                                    —Colten Biro, SJ

 

 

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!