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May 22, 2018

Mark 9:30-37

They went on from there and passed through Galilee. He did not want anyone to know it; for he was teaching his disciples, saying to them, “The Son of Man is to be betrayed into human hands, and they will kill him, and three days after being killed, he will rise again.” But they did not understand what he was saying and were afraid to ask him.

Then they came to Capernaum; and when he was in the house he asked them, “What were you arguing about on the way?” But they were silent, for on the way they had argued with one another who was the greatest. He sat down, called the twelve, and said to them, “Whoever wants to be first must be last of all and servant of all.”

Then he took a little child and put it among them; and taking it in his arms, he said to them, “Whoever welcomes one such child in my name welcomes me, and whoever welcomes me welcomes not me but the one who sent me.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Compare and despair

There’s a phrase used by Jesuits – “compare and despair.” That is, when we look around, there’s always someone holier, smarter, more attractive, more productive, more popular, more perfect, more Jesuit.

I have this tendency–to see others’ gifts and, in turn, see myself as less than. More dangerously, I see others’ gifts and try to become something I am not.

Both are expressions of my struggle to accept God’s love. Both seem to say that God didn’t make me well enough. I don’t think I’m the only person who sometimes feels this way, and it is exhausting.

But, somehow God always finds a way to remind me that I am already as great as I need to be. My greatness is my goodness. My gifts are a manifestation of God’s work. I am well-made. Deep down, I know this is true.

Now – what can compare with that?

—Eric Immel, SJ, is the Associate Dean for Student Success at Arrupe College and an editor for The Jesuit Post.

Prayer

Jesus, I feel within me a great desire to please you but, at the same time, I feel totally incapable of doing this without your special light and help, which I can expect only from you. Accomplish your will within me—even in spite of me.

—St. Claude de la Colombier, SJ

 


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May 22, 2018

Mark 9:30-37

They went on from there and passed through Galilee. He did not want anyone to know it; for he was teaching his disciples, saying to them, “The Son of Man is to be betrayed into human hands, and they will kill him, and three days after being killed, he will rise again.” But they did not understand what he was saying and were afraid to ask him.

Then they came to Capernaum; and when he was in the house he asked them, “What were you arguing about on the way?” But they were silent, for on the way they had argued with one another who was the greatest. He sat down, called the twelve, and said to them, “Whoever wants to be first must be last of all and servant of all.”

Then he took a little child and put it among them; and taking it in his arms, he said to them, “Whoever welcomes one such child in my name welcomes me, and whoever welcomes me welcomes not me but the one who sent me.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Compare and despair

There’s a phrase used by Jesuits – “compare and despair.” That is, when we look around, there’s always someone holier, smarter, more attractive, more productive, more popular, more perfect, more Jesuit.

I have this tendency–to see others’ gifts and, in turn, see myself as less than. More dangerously, I see others’ gifts and try to become something I am not.

Both are expressions of my struggle to accept God’s love. Both seem to say that God didn’t make me well enough. I don’t think I’m the only person who sometimes feels this way, and it is exhausting.

But, somehow God always finds a way to remind me that I am already as great as I need to be. My greatness is my goodness. My gifts are a manifestation of God’s work. I am well-made. Deep down, I know this is true.

Now – what can compare with that?

—Eric Immel, SJ, is the Associate Dean for Student Success at Arrupe College and an editor for The Jesuit Post.

Prayer

Jesus, I feel within me a great desire to please you but, at the same time, I feel totally incapable of doing this without your special light and help, which I can expect only from you. Accomplish your will within me—even in spite of me.

—St. Claude de la Colombier, SJ

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!